AMOS: A User Guide

This user guide will familiarize you with AMOS, including basic site navigation, adding and rating cameras, and geolocating cameras.

Logging On To AMOS


To log onto AMOS, direct your web-browser to amos.cse.wustl.edu. Your screen should resemble something similar to the following:

There are many different places that can be navigated to from this page. The main pages include:

  • Project Overview - The homescreen
  • Dataset Info - Information about the AMOS dataset
  • Browse Cameras - Browse through all of the cameras which AMOS records
  • Browse Map - An interactive map of the location of each of the cameras that AMOS records
  • Submit Camera - Do you want to contribute to the AMOS dataset? Submit a camera here!

You are now logged on to AMOS, feel free to explore and learn!

Browsing The Cameras


As a user of AMOS, it is important to be able to browse through the collection of cameras.

1. Navigate to the right side of the AMOS homepage and click on Browse Cameras. This page will display 25 more cameras - Your screen should resemble something similar to the following:

2. Click on the text which reads "Next" (it is on the right hand side of the "Browse Cameras" title). This will display the next 25 most highly rated cameras. If you have clicked "Next" at any time, then you will also be able to navigate backwards by clicking on the text labeled "Previous" (it is on the left hand side of the "Browse Cameras" title)

3. Locate the search box (it is directly underneath the "Browse Cameras" title). This search box will let you search for a specific type of camera that exists in the AMOS dataset.

3.1. Click in this box - the text "search" should disappear, and the box should become focused.
3.2. Type "Mountains" into the search box.
3.3. Press the "return" or "enter" key on your keyboard.

Your Browse screen should now display the 25 most highly rated cameras with Mountains in them!

Viewing a Camera


On the Browse Cameras page, there were an array of cameras on the page, each having an image and a name. To view one of these cameras:

1. Locate a camera that you would like to explore (via the browse instructions)
2. Click anywhere on the image or name of the camera icon. This will bring you to a page that looks like the following (of course, you may have chosen a different camera!):

3. Observe many different key components of the Camera page:

  • The timestamp of the image - Located directly underneath the image, the timestamp records the exact time the image was captured.
  • The image comparison slider - This tool lets you compare images captured close to the same time, but on different days or years.
  • The summary widget - Located directly underneath the image comparison slider, the summary widget displays (per pixel) the average RGB value of the image. [[TODO - INCLUDE STUFF ABOUT PCA SUMMARY IN THIS]]
  • The weather widget - Located on the bottom left of the summary image, the weather widget will display the weather conditions of the scene at the time the image was captured.
  • The Camera Information widget - Located on the bottom right, this widget contains information regarding the camera, such as name, capture times, etc.
  • The Rating widget - Located directly underneath the Camera Information widget, the Rating widget allows a user to rate a camera for quality.
  • The Geolocation Map [[update picture to incorporate this]] - Located directly underneath the Weather widget, the Geolocation Map displays where the camera is known to exist, or is estimated to exist. It also allows for a user to update a camera's location.

4. Navigate to images captured in different times (be sure to have the main image in view):

  • Navigate to images captured earlier and later in the day by pressing the "Down" and "Up" keys on the keyboard.
  • Navigate to images captured earlier and later in the year by pressing the "Left" and "Right" keys on the keyboard.

If you have a general time-range in mind, you can also click anywhere on the summary image, and the image that was captured closest to that time will be loaded and come into view.

Navigation to different years is possible by clicking either the "Back" or "Next" labels that are located to the left and right of the Year label on the summary image.

Rating a Camera


Cameras are rated by users of AMOS. The ratings are used to differentiate between good and bad cameras, which makes searching for specific and good cameras easier. Rate a webcam by:

1. Navigate to a specific camera's page (See "3 - Viewing a Camera") and locate the Rating widget. It should look similar to the following:


2. Determine the quality of the camera (quality can be a measure of image size, clarity, etc.)
3. Click on a star to rate the camera. Clicking on the rightmose star gives the highest possible rating.

The ratings from each user are averaged to compute the final rating for the camera. The more that people rate, the better search results will be - so do not hesitate to rate a camera!

Geolocating a Camera


Cameras can be geolocated (or located on a map) by users of AMOS. A known camera location enhances scientific research by providing additional information about the camera's surroundings. A user can geolocate a camera by:

1. Navigate to a specific cameras page (See "3 - Viewing a Camera") and locating the Geolocation Map. It should look similar to the following:


2. Determine the location of the camera (this can be done via web searches, or if you happen to actually know the location of the camera, etc.)
3. Dragging the map until the red cross is centered on the known camera location.
4. Zoom in using the "plus" icon in the top left of the map, and refine the location of the red cross.
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 until a reasonable accuracy has been achieved.
6. Click the "Update location" button to update the location of the camera.

Obtaining accurate locations for many cameras is extremely useful for research purposes, so please do not hesitate to geolocate a camera!

Submitting a Camera


A user can contribute to AMOS by submitting publicly available cameras that are connected to the Internet. Submitting a camera is simple:

Required Materials - The URL of a publicly available camera that is connected to the Internet.

1. Navigate to the right side of the AMOS homepage and click on Submit Camera. Your screen should look similar to the following image:

2. Required Information

  • In the textbox labeled "Image URL", enter in the URL of the image produced by the camera (Not the URL to website that hosts the camera!)
  • In the textbox labeled "Short description", enter in a short description of the camera. Examples include "Florida beach" or "Mt. Everest".

3. Optional Information

  • In the textbox labeled "Source URL", enter in the URL of the webpage that hosts the camera, or the webpage of the camera's owner. (Do not enter in the URL of the camera's image here)
  • In the textbox labeled "Comma, separated, tags", enter comma separated, descriptive words that describe features of the image. Examples include "trees, buildings" or "cars"

4. Geolocation

If you know the location of the camera, then you can enter this information as follows:

If you know the latitude and longitude of the camera:
1. Look for the textbox labeled "Search for location" on the top right of the map.
2. Enter in the latitude, and then a comma, and then the longitude. Example: "45, 45"
3. Click the button titled "Search" which is directly to the right of the textbox.
4. The map will update its focus to the location you entered. If the map did not update, make sure you entered in the latitude and longitude correctly.

5. Submitting the Camera

Review the information you entered, and when you are confident that the input is correct, click the "Submit" button that is on the left, underneath the map.

AMOS will try to validate the input, and will notify you if there are any issues. These notifications will appear to the right of the textboxes in red text.

Viewing the Camera Map


A user can easily view cameras with known locations that are in the AMOS dataset as follows:

1. Navigate to the right side of the AMOS homepage and click on Browse Map. This page will contain a large world map, and circles with numbers will slowly appear. Your screen should look similar to the following:

2. The circles represent cameras near a certain location, and clicking on a circle zooms into the circle. This will show more detailed clusters of cameras in a smaller space.
3. Green points represent cameras, and clicking on them will display the most recent image that the camera has captured.
4. You can click on this image, or the link directly above it, to navigate to the camera's page (See Viewing a Camera for further instructions). You can also click the "x" on the top right of the pop-up window to close it.

Created by Chris Hawley